How to find a Neighbourhood with the best schools


One of the most important aspects of buying a new house is finding a neighbourhood that has good schools. There are no hard and fast rules to follow when you’re seeking an area with the best schools for your children. 

Public or Private Schools?

Many people opt for private schools without questioning anything else about the schools. Public schools are not always worse than private schools. Each one is unique. There are good public schools and lousy private schools. 

As your children approach the age for schooling, you will want to look for a school that is diverse. It should also be a good fit for your children. 

Learn about Neighbourhood Schools

You may opt to attend school fairs and orientation sessions. Your choice will not be made just on these events, though. You can find out a lot about neighbourhoods with good schools through the Homely platform. Reviews are one of the greatest ways to find out detailed information. 

Talk to people in the neighbourhood about the local schools. Ask teachers where they send their children. Speak candidly with people about a variety of schools. Speak to students, too. Their perspective is quite valuable, since they live within a school every weekday. 

 Seeing how kids interact with teachers and other students is a great way to see if this is a good choice. 

 Seeing how kids interact with teachers and other students is a great way to see if this is a good choice. 

Look at Local discussions

One of the great advantages of www.homely.com.au is its ability to collate thousands of reviews and local answers to questions. Questions such as "What is the best school in Melbourne?" already exists with over 339 responses. You can view it here 

http://www.homely.com.au/kew-boroondara-melbourne-greater-victoria/questions/best-school-in-melbourne

Or alternatively you can set your own local discussion up about the areas you are interested in schooling information. 

Visit Neighbourhood Schools

There’s nothing quite like test-driving a school. If you are allowed, observe some of the teachers in their classrooms. Students should be engaged by teachers. Teachers should check to make sure that all students are keeping up with the information being provided. Are the children who are working in small groups actually talking about schoolwork, or just chatting? 

Would you want to attend the school you are visiting, if you were school age? Visit several schools, to get a sense of each place. You should discuss what you learn at each school, and points where you and your husband or wife disagree. It doesn’t take as much time as you would think. 

 Could you see yourself there as a kid? Does it look like the kids are having fun?

 Could you see yourself there as a kid? Does it look like the kids are having fun?

Be Diligent

Gather pertinent information, but don’t get so caught up in information that you are too overwhelmed to make a good choice. Look at the big picture. There are no perfect schools, and if you search for one, you are doomed to failure. Once you gather information and choose what you believe to be the neighbourhood with the best schools, trust the professionals at these schools to do their jobs. 

Schools with smaller class sizes will help your children to get the attention they need in order to learn. If schools will allow parents to drop in anytime, they don’t have things they may be trying to hide. Schools that only run pre-set “tours” with parents may have something they’d prefer you didn’t know. 

Being a Picky Parent

This doesn’t mean getting in the way of the teachers at the school you choose. Push for more choices for your kids. In Australia, you will be sent enrolment information about the schools for which your child is qualified, before each new school year begins. Do your own homework, so that your child is afforded the best opportunities. 

You can find more information, and even ask your own question about a local area by visiting  http://www.homely.com.au/posts/questions/ask

Source: http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2086809,00.html

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