It might seem like once you’ve found the right colour for all your window treatments, the decision-making process is over. Of course, as with so many aspects of your décor, colour is indeed important. However, there are some other things to consider when you’re faced with a whole array of drapes and blinds.

Lighting: This depends on the room’s purpose and the available natural light. You may want heavier draperies or blackout shades in bedrooms. Along with considerations of heat and privacy, you’ll want to be careful about not letting carpet or furniture fade. Layering heavier, more decorative curtains with a back sheer treatment is a nicely decorative way to let light into a lounge while still keeping some privacy. 

Climate Control: Tent-flap panel treatments provide good insulation in drafty rooms, or if heat from sunlight causes problems in summer. Shutters or blinds can also help block out some light while still letting enough in, as well as letting air circulate.

Window treatments change the facade of bland windows to make them a feature. The tips will provide the best options

Window treatments change the facade of bland windows to make them a feature. The tips will provide the best options

Room aesthetic: The heaviness of fabric you use, as well as the hanging style, should fit the style of the furniture, if only on a “traditional or modern?” level. Try to match the level of either decorative flair or simplicity.

Window type/function: French doors generally need either a cornice or easy-to-move panels to stay functional. Think also about how often you’ll want to open or close the treatment or the window itself—for a patio door or kitchen window that somebody’s constantly going through, you won’t want to make use too much of a hassle. You’ll also want to consider how much cross-breeze you want to let through: lowered blinds tend to block a lot of the circulating air before it can get into the room.

Privacy: In bedrooms and bathrooms (especially on the ground floor), you’ll likely be looking for something harder to see through. For bedrooms, heavier draperies or roller shades will provide good cover when wanted. In bathrooms, where you’ll regularly want both privacy and available light, a perforated shade, cellular shades that can be pulled up from the bottom, or frosted window covers will work. 

Cleaning: While shutters and blinds will sometimes need dusting, softer or heavier cloth draperies will too, and will also need to be taken off, washed, and rehung, which can be a major project, especially when you’re covering a bay window or other large sets of window panels. While that’s not necessarily a reason to avoid getting bigger curtains, it’s something to be aware of while making your decision.

If you have undergone renovations or changed your window displays be sure to tweet us a photo for us to display here 

 

 

 

 

Comment